inothernews:

BORDERLAND   This satellite image shows a pipeline fire in Homs, Syria. The pipeline,  which runs through the rebel-held neighbourhood of Baba Amr, had been  shelled by regime troops for the previous 12 days, according to two  activist groups, the Local Coordination Committees and the Britain-based  Syrian Observatory for Human Rights. The state news agency, SANA,  blamed “armed terrorists” for the pipeline attack.  (Photo: Digital Globe / AP via the Telegraph)

inothernews:

BORDERLAND   This satellite image shows a pipeline fire in Homs, Syria. The pipeline, which runs through the rebel-held neighbourhood of Baba Amr, had been shelled by regime troops for the previous 12 days, according to two activist groups, the Local Coordination Committees and the Britain-based Syrian Observatory for Human Rights. The state news agency, SANA, blamed “armed terrorists” for the pipeline attack.  (Photo: Digital Globe / AP via the Telegraph)

Categories: syria, aerial shot,
via npr

They call it the widows’ basement. Crammed amid makeshift beds and scattered belongings are frightened women and children trapped in the horror of Homs, the Syrian city shaken by two weeks of relentless bombardment.

Among the 300 huddling in this wood factory cellar in the besieged district of Baba Amr is 20-year-old Noor, who lost her husband and her home to the shells and rockets.

“Our house was hit by a rocket so 17 of us were staying in one room,” she recalls as Mimi, her three-year-old daughter, and Mohamed, her five-year-old son, cling to her abaya.

“We had had nothing but sugar and water for two days and my husband went to try to find food.” It was the last time she saw Maziad, 30, who had worked in a mobile phone repair shop. “He was torn to pieces by a mortar shell.”

For Noor, it was a double tragedy. Adnan, her 27-year-old brother, was killed at Maziad’s side.

Everyone in the cellar has a similar story of hardship or death. The refuge was chosen because it is one of the few basements in Baba Amr. Foam mattresses are piled against the walls and the children have not seen the light of day since the siege began on February 4. Most families fled their homes with only the clothes on their backs.

The city is running perilously short of supplies and the only food here is rice, tea and some tins of tuna delivered by a local sheikh who looted them from a bombed-out supermarket.

A baby born in the basement last week looked as shellshocked as her mother, Fatima, 19, who fled there when her family’s single-storey house was obliterated. “We survived by a miracle,” she whispers. Fatima is so traumatised that she cannot breastfeed, so the baby has been fed only sugar and water; there is no formula milk.

Fatima may or may not be a widow. Her husband, a shepherd, was in the countryside when the siege started with a ferocious barrage and she has heard no word of him since.

The widows’ basement reflects the ordeal of 28,000 men, women and children clinging to existence in Baba Amr, a district of low concrete-block homes surrounded on all sides by Syrian forces. The army is launching Katyusha rockets, mortar shells and tank rounds at random.

Snipers on the rooftops of al-Ba’ath University and other high buildings surrounding Baba Amr shoot any civilian who comes into their sights. Residents were felled in droves in the first days of the siege but have now learnt where the snipers are and run across junctions where they know they can be seen. Few cars are left on the streets.

Almost every building is pock-marked after tank rounds punched through concrete walls or rockets blasted gaping holes in upper floors. The building I was staying in lost its upper floor to a rocket last Wednesday. On some streets whole buildings have collapsed — all there is to see are shredded clothes, broken pots and the shattered furniture of families destroyed.

It is a city of the cold and hungry, echoing to exploding shells and bursts of gunfire. There are no telephones and the electricity has been cut off. Few homes have diesel for the tin stoves they rely on for heat in the coldest winter that anyone can remember. Freezing rain fills potholes and snow drifts in through windows empty of glass. No shops are open, so families are sharing what they have with relatives and neighbours. Many of the dead and injured are those who risked foraging for food.

Fearing the snipers’ merciless eyes, families resorted last week to throwing bread across rooftops, or breaking through communal walls to pass unseen.

The Syrians have dug a huge trench around most of the district, and let virtually nobody in or out. The army is pursuing a brutal campaign to quell the resistance of Homs, Hama and other cities that have risen up against Bashar al-Assad, the Syrian president, whose family has been in power for 42 years.

In Baba Amr, the Free Syrian Army (FSA), the armed face of opposition to Assad, has virtually unanimous support from civilians who see them as their defenders. It is an unequal battle: the tanks and heavy weaponry of Assad’s troops against the Kalashnikovs of the FSA.

About 5,000 Syrian soldiers are believed to be on the outskirts of Baba Amr, and the FSA received reports yesterday that they were preparing a ground assault. The residents dread the outcome.

“We live in fear the FSA will leave the city,” said Hamida, 43, hiding with her children and her sister’s family in an empty ground-floor apartment after their house was bombed. “There will be a massacre.”

On the lips of everyone was the question: “Why have we been abandoned by the world?”

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Categories: syria, war,
Free Syrian Army soldiers in a pickup truck guarded Idlib, Syria,  Tuesday. Activists said government forces pounded rebel strongholds in  Homs, killing at least 30 people, and another 33 were killed in the  Jabal al-Zawiya region during a government raid.

Free Syrian Army soldiers in a pickup truck guarded Idlib, Syria, Tuesday. Activists said government forces pounded rebel strongholds in Homs, killing at least 30 people, and another 33 were killed in the Jabal al-Zawiya region during a government raid.

Categories: syria, politics, military,
Black smoke rose from an oil pipeline that was attacked in Homs, Syria. The state-run Syrian Arab News Agency said an armed terrorist  group committed the act of sabotage.

Black smoke rose from an oil pipeline that was attacked in Homs, Syria. The state-run Syrian Arab News Agency said an armed terrorist group committed the act of sabotage.

Categories: syria, terrorism,
Supporters of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad rallied near the Syrian  Embassy in Beirut, Lebanon, Monday. In Daraa, Syria, a witness said  security forces fired shots in the air and tear gas at a crowd of about  4,000 people as they protested for political freedom.

Supporters of Syrian President Bashar al-Assad rallied near the Syrian Embassy in Beirut, Lebanon, Monday. In Daraa, Syria, a witness said security forces fired shots in the air and tear gas at a crowd of about 4,000 people as they protested for political freedom.

Categories: syria, protest,
A  Syrian Muslim girl stands at the top of Mount Qassioun, which overlooks  Damascus city, during sunset and prays before eating her Iftar meal on  August 22, 2010.

A Syrian Muslim girl stands at the top of Mount Qassioun, which overlooks Damascus city, during sunset and prays before eating her Iftar meal on August 22, 2010.

Categories: syria, religion,
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